Sunday, July 30, 2006

Qana massacre PART TWO



Qana massacre (April,18, 1996)
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Qana massacre TODAY (July, 30, 2006)
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More to come from the Zionists..

Read about the first massacre HERE

Thursday, July 20, 2006

Save Lebanon


This post is dedicated to all the people of Lebanon. Especially, my boss Mr. Khaled and all my co-workers. Our prayers go to your families and friends in Lebanon.

"What a cruel thing is war: to separate and destroy families and friends, and mar the purest joys and happiness God has granted us in this world; to fill our hearts with hatred instead of love for our neighbors, and to devastate the fair face of this beautiful world." - Robert E. Lee in a letter written to his wife - 1864

Let us all stand together as one and save Lebanon!

(Thanks Scarl0)



Sunday, July 16, 2006

Places of non-interest.

I guess Purgs created his own cult of a new breed of cartographers.

Check out the places I've been to:



create your own visited countries map
or vertaling Duits Nederlands



create your own visited states map
or check out these Google Hacks.

Wow I've sure been around in the States. Never been west of the Rockies though. Thanks dad.

Saturday, July 15, 2006

War against Islam

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم
و اعتصموا بحبل الله جميعا ولا تفرقوا

صدق الله العظيم




There is no time for us muslims to say I'm sunni or I'm she'i ! The jews out there are killing dozens of muslim women and children..They have been doing this for decades..but we had enough and it is time for payback!





Does she look like a soldier?! Did Bush see this picture?!





Oh! He's carrying a baby! What a fucking hypocrite!
Why veto when you're watching those children getting killed?!
I hope you burn in hell you bastard!




I'm sure that the Arab summit will stop every single war in the world.. MY HAIRY ASS!!
What did they do when Iraq invaded us? NOTHING!
What are they going to do about Lebanon? NOTHING!




Here they come the puppets!! they're happy about whats going on! And they will not support Hizballah..!

Now since Saudi Arabia is out of it..I hope they stay out of everything next time and just tell us when is Ramadan! The only thing they're good at.

Tuesday, July 11, 2006

He died for his country...


ROME (Reuters) - A 77-year-old Italian pensioner fell off a
ladder and died as he tried to attach Italy's flag to a pole
ahead of Sunday's World Cup final against France.

The man, Rodolfo Profili, was raising the flag on a patch
of land he owned near the central Italian city of Viterbo when
he apparently lost his balance and fell eight metres into a
precipice, Italian news agency ANSA reported.

ANSA quoted local police as saying the man died instantly,
still clutching the tricolore.



(Talk about patroitism!)

Monday, July 10, 2006

FORZA AZZURI!


!WHAT A WONDERFUL ENDING FOR THE WORLD CUP!
!ITALIA WORLD CHAMPIONS FOR THE 4TH TIME!




THATS WHAT YOU GET WHEN YOU TRY TO ACT LIKE A BULL! ZIDANE "WAS" A GOOD PLAYER..BUT ALL ITALIAN FANS SHOULD THANK HIM FOR HIS HIGH QUALITY STUPIDITY ..SO THANKS ZIDANE :*


**Sorry folks .. I couldn't help it but i'm a huge fan of italy**

Friday, July 07, 2006

كلب بن16..!


الطالباني: العراق غير ملزم بالديون
كتب ناصر العتيبي وكونا: فيما أعلن الرئيس العراقي جلال الطالباني ان العراق غير ملزم بتسديد الديون التي كانت على العراق إبان فترة حكم الرئيس العراقي المخلوع صدام حسين، أكدت مصادر كويتية مطلعة ان هذه المسألة خاضعة لقرارات الشرعية الدولية ونادي باريس، وهي الفيصل في حسم أي قضايا عالقة.وقال الطالباني في مؤتمر صحفي عقده في بغداد إن القانون الدولي يوضح انه ليس من حق الدول التي كانت تساعد الدكتاتورية، وترتبت لها ديون ان تطلب من دولة ديموقراطية أعقبت الدولة الدكتاتورية السابقة تسديد تلك الديون، معربا عن أمله في أن يبادر العرب إلى إلغاء تلك الديون.وكشف الطالباني ان العراق يعمل على تهيئة مذكرة بهذا الموضوع، موضحا ان 'هناك مادة صريحة في القانون الدولي تنص على ذلك لكننا لا نريد استخدام هذه المادة مع الدول، ونسعى للتعاون والتجاوب الودي من خلال التشجيع على إقامة مشروعات واستثمارات في العراق
والزفتاني تحدث ..يا جماعة شصاير بالدنيا؟! يعني احنا ما انخلص من هذول البواليع اللي انترست من خيرنا و هم مبطله حلوجها! فلسطين الحرة و العراق المجيد!! بس يا حكومه بس تكفون شوفوا الشعب شنو يبي بالاول و بعدين شوفوا البواليع شنو يبيلها "غير التيزاب ما ينفع" !! تدرون اشلون..خلي الحكومه توزع على المواطنين تنكات زيطوناط و جم كاسور و يعطون آبار النفط حق "الزلمات" و "بو عرقه"و تالي نفتك منهم
يعني انت الحين يا الزفتاني ما تدري انه الشعب الكويتي لي الحين يعاني من آثار الغزو؟! الظاهر صاحبنا الزفتاني نسى حالات الاغتصاب اللي صارت..نسى الدمار و آخرتها يقولي مو ملزومين!! والله كلب بن16 مو كفو تفله لا انت ولا الجرو محمود عباس

Thursday, July 06, 2006

Friday Night Rally: 7/7/2006


There will be a rally on Friday night at 8:30pm

Location is the same, across from the Parliament building on Gulf Road.

BE there! Let the world hear our collective voices as one!

Wednesday, July 05, 2006

A Letter To Arab Times

Dear Arab Times:

I've been reading your crappy rag ever since I came to Kuwait in 1987. Ever since picking up the first rag, I've been SO enthralled by your idiotic spelling and grammatical mistakes that makes you SO unique. Is it some sort of marketing strategy? Or is it utter ignorance?


I used the word 'unique' because you are supposed to be the 'leading newspaper' in Kuwait. Do your proof readers even remotely know what ENGLISH is? Who the hell are the proofreaders? Give me their names & numbers, I will be MORE than happy to smack them upside their fool heads and give them a crash course in English composition. You are nothing but COMPLETE FAILURES.


Now, Mr. Ahmad Jarallah...let us in on your secret. Is it Babelfish you're using? Or FreeTranslations.com? It's ok nobody will laugh, I promise. *
snickers*

Do me and everyone else a favor, Mr. Jarallah: Fire the fucking quadriplegic dyslexics (run for the
dictionary, quick! Moron.) and hire on REAL people who know how to spell & write in proper English. You're mangling the fucking language.

Excuse
MY language, but I sure as hell know how to f-u-c-k-i-n-g spell! Oh and I'd like to add, this is an excerpt from one of your articles:

"A Kuwaiti man who was injured when the ceiling of Ward No. 12 of the Adan Hospital collapsed on his head, has been admitted to the intensive care unit of the hospital, reports Al-Anba daily." .... "The concerned authorities have launched an investigation to find out what made the wall to collapse."

I'll give you a Kinder Surprise Egg if you can find where the mistake in the above article is. First it's a ceiling and then it's a wall? MAKE UP YOUR MIND!

To wrap it up. I've been reading the Arab Times from 1987 till today, and congratulations...Not a single page of yours is error free.

Fix your pathetic 'establishment'. I'll be kind enough to point you in the right direction if you need a new HR manager.

Sincerely,

R.

(To Kuwait Times: Don't be too happy dumbasses. You're just as stupid too.)

Monday, July 03, 2006

Watani Online: FINALLY

Good news for all the Mozilla/Safari users out there. Watani Online is finally compatible with all open source browsers.

I literally fell outta my chair when I saw their banner on the WOL page and blurted out, "Good God guys you won't believe what I'm looking at right now!"

One of the guys, dirty-minded as usual blurted,"good porn?!"

I'm haBBy :D

Saturday, July 01, 2006

Analysis: Kuwait's elections & reforms (Int'l Intelligence)

Article can be found here.


By SANA ABDALLAH

AMMAN, Jordan, July 1 (UPI) -- The democratic
exercise in Kuwait's early parliamentary elections may have given the
oil-rich emirate something to boast about, but the polls seem to have
backfired against the regime with the opposition's sweeping victory.


The new emir of the oil-rich Gulf state, Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad
al-Sabah, dissolved parliament on May 21 and ordered early elections in
an effort to end a political crisis between the government and
legislature over electoral reforms.


But the results of the June 29 elections, which brought to
parliament an even bigger opposition of liberal and Islamist members,
constitutes a setback for the al-Sabah regime as the new parliament is
expected to push harder for democratic reforms and fighting corruption.


The opposition swept two-thirds of the 50-seat parliament as a
coalition of 33 liberal and Islamic candidates won, up from 29 members
in the dissolved legislature, with several independents who can sway in
favor of reforms.


Although these were the first polls to include women in this small
oil-rich state, none of the 28 women candidates managed to grab a
parliamentary seat.


While al-Sabah congratulated the candidates on their victory as
Kuwait set a democratic example for the rest of the Gulf and Arab
region, analysts say the emir, who assumed power in January, has more
to worry about now as he takes the next two weeks to form a new
government, in which fifteen cabinet members are entitled to vote in
parliament.


The reformers in the dissolved parliament, most of whom were
re-elected, had threatened to stop cooperating with the government if
it did not reduce the number of voting constituencies from 25 to five
in an effort to stop vote-buying and other irregularities. The
opposition had rejected a government offer to reduce the districts to
ten and the dispute gave birth to a so-called "orange revolution" of
active, yet tame, youth taking to the streets calling for reforms to
fight what they say is state-sponsored corruption.


The straw that broke the camel's back and prompted the emir's
dissolution of parliament was a threat by reformer parliament members
to grill the prime minister, Sheikh Nasser Mohammad al-Sabah, a nephew
of the emir.


Analysts say with a larger opposition in the new parliament that
ran on a platform of reforming the electoral bill and fighting
corruption, the ruler of Kuwait will now need to shape a new government
that excludes key ministers the opposition accuses of corruption and
inefficiency, such as outgoing energy and information ministers, Sheikh
Ahmad al-Fahd al-Sabah and Mohammad al-Sanousi respectively.


While the Kuwaiti parliament has no constitutional powers to vote
out cabinet or prime ministers, it can declare its refusal to cooperate
with the government, leaving the next step to the emir, who would
either dismiss the prime minister and appoint a new cabinet, or
dissolve parliament and call for new elections.


Analysts say the fact that reformers gained yet more ground under
the disputed 25-constituency system should give more weight to the
pro-government forces seeking to maintain so many districts. The
pro-government forces could argue these polls prove that the number of
districts has no effect on the voting exercise and does not necessarily
favor one trend over another in a country where political parties are
banned, but groups of different political trends are free to work.


However, the opposition victory -- even under the disputed system
-- has given more strength to the reformers in their demands to change
the elections bill and has put the emir in a tight position that may
lead him to finally yield to diluting the voting districts to five.


Kuwaiti analysts say if the emir wants to avoid plunging the
country into another political crisis between the establishment and the
reformers, who are gaining more grassroots support, he would need to
name a new government with clear instructions to agree on the
sought-after elections bill. After that, he may resort to dissolving
parliament again and order fresh polls according to a five-constituency
system. Otherwise, the emir would allow parliament to live out its
four-year term and hold the next elections in 2010 under the new
system.


Either way, the opposition would have achieved a peaceful victory
unseen in the conservative Arab Gulf region where free elections are
practically non-existent. Such a victory could also set a precedent
that may unleash more demands for deep-rooted reforms deemed taboo and
revolutionary, threatening the status quo of ruling families.


The campaigns during Kuwait's elections saw unprecedented sharp
criticism of the government, and by de facto the ruling al-Sabah
family, questioning its role in the running of the state's affairs
where the emir has the final say in all matters.


Some Islamist candidates, having won 21 seats in parliament, are
even seeking to turn the emirate, which sits on 10 percent of the
world's oil reserves, into a constitutional monarchy where the prime
minister and cabinet members are not appointed by the emir and his
relatives.


However, once the issues that united the forces from the far-left
to the far-right under the umbrella of the opposition have been
resolved, the coalition of the reformers may easily collapse and
restore strength to the regime.


The new reformer parliament members extend from Islamists seeking
an Islamic state system and opposing women participation in the
elections, to secular liberals aspiring for a more westernized Kuwait.


Analysts expect the government to capitalize on the disharmony
between the two sides to weaken the opposition and move on with its
agenda that would maintain the status quo as much as possible.


In the next few months, Arab eyes will undoubtedly remain fixed on
this tiny state in anticipation of the kind of change the people hope,
and ruling families dread, would infect the rest of the region.